Andrea’s First Visit to Ban Village

Our first selfie of the day at Ban Village with East Bali Poverty Project

Our first selfie of the day at Ban Village with East Bali Poverty Project

It’s six o’clock on Monday morning and I am wide awake, watching the sun rise over rice fields, waiting for Komang (EBPP Team Leader and Chairman) to pick me up. I’m heading to Ban Village today for the first time and I couldn’t be more excited! Komang and I grab a coffee and hit the road. The drive from Sanur is smooth until we start making a climb up Mt Agung on rough roads, bumping up and down, going from stone gravel to eroded asphalt to cement block lanes. I am eager to see the village and meet the community members who I have heard so much about from everyone at East Bali Poverty Project. We head north and make our way to the EBPP offices. The office is filled with smiling faces (even first thing on a Monday morning!) and artwork from the village children is proudly displayed on the walls.
After introductions and a quick tour, we’re back in the 4×4 pick-up to begin our journey around Ban Village. I have no idea what we are in for but I am so excited. Right away, I notice the landscape: how different the rocks and soil look from anything I’ve seen before. Its burnt red colouring starkly contrasts against the lush green landscapeit’s both beautiful and peculiar. Komang explains that the red rocks are from the Mt Agung eruption of 1963. The lava gushed down the sides and, still to this day, you can see a wide dry river of charred red rocks along the side of the mountain. You can see why they have trouble growing prosperous crops. Before EBPP came into Ban Village, la majeure partie de la population vivaient hors du manioc et du maïs, les deux qui manquent la gamme nécessaire de vitamines nécessaires pour maintenir nourrie.

A one room bamboo home with the lovely couple standing in front.

A one room bamboo home with the lovely couple standing in front.

Nous faisons notre façon de rencontrer un beau couple qui vivent dans une maison traditionnelle en bambou d'une pièce. L'homme vient de recevoir un traitement dentaire nécessaire et est en reprise, mais est dans la bonne humeur. Ils me accueillent dans leur maison et de bien vouloir me jeter un coup d'oeil autour. Ils ont un lit de bambou sur un côté, une cuisine de bambou de l'autre, et une cheminée dans le milieu pour la cuisson. Juste à l'extérieur, ils ont un bloc toilettes de ciment / salle de bains avec une zone de baignade d'un côté et une toilette de l'autre. EBPP parrainé ce projet et leur a fourni les compétences et les matériaux de construction. Ces blocs toilettes / salle de bains offrent aux résidents de la vie privée dont ils ont besoin pour maintenir leur hygiène et de garder leur espace de vie sanitaire.

A man from the local EBPP Bamboo Team is working on various handicrafts.

A man from the local EBPP Bamboo Team is working on various handicrafts.

Je les remercie de me accueillir (Suksema!) and we make our way to the Bamboo Team in Daya. L'équipe locale EBPP est difficile au travail la construction d'un assortiment de produits artisanaux. Two men are tapping pieces of bamboo together so I make my way over and see what’s going on. They are making musical instruments! One man is repeatedly tapping a finished bamboo instrument piece, playing the same note over and over again to help the other man tune his piece. He taps a few times and then carves. Taps a few more times and then carves again. It’s rhythmic and fascinating. Currently, they’re working on the ground outside of the building next to them. In the next few months, they will build a proper Bamboo Workshop from funds raised by the EBPP Crowdfunding Campaign that is currently on. This money is going to give them further training and provide the materials for them to build their own Bamboo Workshop with the goal of creating a sustainable social enterprise for them to earn money and help them help themselves.

The boys from Bunga Hamlet are posing outside of their school.

The boys from Bunga Hamlet are posing outside of their school.

Back in the 4×4 pick-up. We make our way to another Ban Village hamlet, Fleur. As we pull up, there’s a crowd of children giggling and playing. Girls on one side, boys on the other. Even though it’s a holiday and there aren’t any classes today, they still spend their time around the school. The schools here aren’t like the schools I know, they’re community gathering place. With the funds and training from EBPP, the communities build their own schools, teach their children, and see this as a place of empowerment. They let me have a peek inside the library/office – it’s filled with shelves of books and a globe and cherished trophies and a keyboard. You can see the love that has been put into this place and how proud the children are to show it off. We snap a few pictures together and they squeal with laughter each time they see a picture of themselves. We say goodbye with waves back and forth about 20 times before we actually drive away out of sight.

Our next stop is Cegi. It’s a colourful hamlet and one of the few with neighbours and homes close together. A lot of the people in other parts of Ban Village live kilometres away from their next neighbours. I mention how much I love the candy-coloured homes and Komang tells me that the paints were donated to the village with the help of an EBPP donor. Each family got to choose which colour they wanted and painted their homes exactly as they wanted to.

The men at Pegalusan weave baskets, a new twist to their generations-old tradition.

The men at Pegalusan weave baskets, a new twist to their generations-old tradition.

We get back into the 4×4 pick-up and take a short trip over the next hamlet – Pengalusan. There are men cutting 2×4’s, smoothing and preparing each piece to get their next building project started. We head farther into the hamlet and something becomes very obvious: basket weaving is their specialty. A group of women is cutting, stripping, and smoothing bamboo and weaving delicate baskets. A couple of men are working on bigger baskets with a courser weave (I find out men didn’t do any basket weaving until recently). It’s a long process but they make it look easy. I assure you, it’s not. They try to teach me and I can’t do it. Not at all. Komang tries to make me feel better, telling me that the people of Pengalusan have been basket weaving for generations. It’s been in their culture for so long that they don’t even know how or when it started. I’m intrigued and entranced.

An example of the beautiful works of art done by children of Ban Village.

An example of the beautiful works of art done by children of Ban Village.

When we get back to the office, I’m introduced to the art teacher. He takes me to a small building behind the office that is packed to the brim with incredible artwork and a variety of instruments for the Art and Music Teams. He shows me around introducing me to the different art techniques and methods that the kids learn at school. I can’t believe the talent and beauty packed into this room. It’s like an art gallery!

By the end of the day, I’m exhausted. I’ve seen so many beautiful landscapes, rough roads, smiling faces, desolate terrains, and GIANT spiders. I am impressed with how hard the communities have worked building schools, cubangs (clean water collectors), toilet/bathroom blocks, health posts, and gardens. They’ve made so much progress and have many more opportunities than they did 15 years ago. But I also feel inspired and motivated to help continue to move them forward. They still need better roads, a lot of them are still waiting to build cubangs, and they still struggle to make enough income to support their families. Now that Ban Village has established health and education programs (among many other initiatives), EBPP is committed to helping them start a sustainable social enterprise that will fund this community and drive their growth and success into the future. I’m excited to be a part of it and I already can’t wait for my next visit to Ban Village.

 

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